The subtle code words Kate Middleton uses to keep her kids from being naughty in public

(Image credit: Getty)

While the Duchess of Cambridge may be one of the most famous mothers in the world, she’s just like any other mum in many ways.

  • The subtle code word Kate Middleton reportedly uses to control her children in public has been revealed.
  • The Duchess is a proud mum to three little royals who often come out for public engagements.
  • This royal news (opens in new tab) comes after Prince George gave his mum an adorable gift for Mother's Day.

She and her husband Prince William are parents to their three young children, Prince George, six, Princess Charlotte, four, and one-year-old Prince Louis and no doubt face the hurdles that come with having brood of little ones.

And with the young royals often making appearances at special public engagements, making sure they’re on their best behaviour is an important job.

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It’s been reported that Duchess Catherine has some subtle tactics that she uses to keep her children from acting up in public.

According to The Sun, Kate has delicate way of hinting to her tots that their behaviour is getting out of hand.

The publication claim the future Queen consort simply tells the kids, “Let’s take a break.”

Credit: Getty

According to parenting expert Dr. Rebecca Chicot, Kate also has some physical communication methods to help her keep Prince George and Princess Charlotte under control when they’re out and about.

"She seems to be good at making warm contact 'touch to the head' which is a nice connection," Chicot said.

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"She gets down to their level to talk to them but let’s them be children. She has a lovely balance of sensitivity and gentle boundaries. She doesn’t expect them to behave like little adults and knows that children go through perfectly natural stages like tantrums.

“Kate is a sensitive and warm mum. This is a called an authoritative style of parenting that is now encouraged. This is compared to an autocratic parenting that was encouraged in some circles in Victorian times (e.g. children should be seen and not heard).”