WhatsApp users warned over fraudsters impersonating chat apps to steal login details

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  • Fresh WhatsApp scam fears with users being warned once again over thousands of websites imitating the popular messaging service in order to steal login information.

    Another official-looking WhatsApp scam has hit again, with the messaging service branding it as a “threat that all users should be aware of.”

    According to the Facebook-owned firm, over 39,000 websites are attempting to steal user information via convincing phoney login screens.

    Scammers use WhatsApp to lead victims to websites that look to be managed by a trusted entity. The scam isn’t exclusive to WhatsApp; as fraudsters are also attempting to steal Facebook, Messenger, and Instagram account information.

    Scammers use WhatsApp to lead victims to websites that look to be managed by a trusted entity. The scam isn't exclusive to WhatsApp; fraudsters are also attempting to steal Facebook, Messenger, and Instagram account information.

    Credits: Getty

    Brits were recently warned to be cautious after a Royal Mail text message scam swept the country, luring consumers expecting shipments into giving their bank info.

    Facebook is now so concerned about the recent string of data-stealing websites that it has filed a lawsuit in an attempt to stop the cyber criminals in their tracks, writing, “Today, we filed a federal lawsuit in California court to disrupt phishing attacks designed to deceive people into sharing their login credentials on fake login pages for Facebook, Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp. Phishing is a significant threat to millions of Internet users.”

    This action is another step towards its continued efforts to protect people’s safety and privacy, sending a clear message to those attempting to exploit Facebook’s platform, and hold those who misuse technology accountable.

    Portrait Of Unhappy Woman At Home With Computer Victim Of Online Crime.

    Credits: Getty

    A Bedford based mother recently took to Facebook to expose a convincing WhatsApp scam in which con artists pretended to be her daughter in order to steal money.

    According to Facebook, any emails related to your account will come from fb.com, facebook.com, or facebookmail.com. To check for urgent updates from the company, go to www.facebook.com or use your Facebook app.

    If you receive a strange email or message from Facebook, WhatsApp, or Instagram, do not open any links or attachments.