Love Island’s Amy Hart opens up on freezing her eggs aged 28 for fears of early menopause

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  • Love Island's Amy Hart has opened up about freezing her eggs aged 28 amid fears she won't be able to have kids naturally before it's too late.

    The reality star, who rose to fame when she entered the Love Island villa in 2019, has never had a boyfriend and admits she can’t see her life without children, even if she doesn’t find a partner to start a family with.

    Former air hostess Amy, who sensationally quit Love Island after having her heart broken by ‘half-boyfriend’ Curtis Pritchard, tried and failed at two runs of egg freezing and started to panic that she may have had to undergo IVF straight away to have a baby.

    Amy’s mum, aunt and grandma all went through early menopause in their forties and after being told her fertility was low following checks last year, the Worthing born star forked out for another attempt to freeze her eggs and was finally successful.

    “I have always wanted kids and can’t see myself ever not having them.  That is why I wanted to freeze my eggs now, while they are still young and healthy,” Amy told The Sun.

    “When my first two attempts failed, it sent me into a panic about whether to do IVF and have a baby immediately, because the freezing was not working.  I felt uncertain about what was going to happen if I went for the third round and it didn’t work.

    “For four weeks (before the treatment) I didn’t have fizzy drinks or alcohol, and I was working out and kept mobile. The procedure involves collecting eggs, freezing them and thawing them when you want to use them for fertility treatment.

    “I had hormone injections for two weeks, which stimulate the ovaries to produce multiple eggs in one cycle.

    “Lucky I did try for that third time, because it worked. I thought this was going to be really easy, but it wasn’t. It is all a lot to go through.”

    Sharing her passion and drive to speak out for women undergoing fertility treatments and IVF alone or with low income, Amy continued, “I feel it is my responsibility, with the platform that I have, to try to normalise egg-freezing. I want to get people talking about it, equipped with the facts. There is a very small percentage of people who can get IVF on the NHS. There is no funding for solo women, and you are already half an income down because you’re solo.”