Why Prince William asks royal staff to not wear 'stuffy' suits around Prince George, Charlotte and Louis

Prince William requests that his staff members wear casual clothes around his kids

Prince William suits staff
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Prince William reportedly requests that his and Princess Catherine's staff ditch their suits while at work, in order to make sure Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis' home isn't a 'stuffy' environment.


Following the release of a book detailing the experiences of royal household staff, it's been claimed that Prince William has specific clothing rules for his aides while they are working in one of the Wales family's homes. 

With Prince William and Kate Middleton splitting their family's time between Adelaide Cottage in Windsor and Amner Hall in Norfolk, it's been said that staff that visit their homes are asked to wear casual clothing for the benefit of George, Charlotte and Louis. 

Prince William suits staff

(Image credit: Getty Images)

According to The Times, Valentine Low’s new book, Courtiers: the Hidden Power Behind the Crown, states that Prince William demands that suits aren't to be worn most of the time. 

"He wants it to be casual,” one member of the Wales' household staff reportedly shared in the book. 

"The kids run around the office, and he does not want it to be stuffy. If we have important meetings, or are going to Buckingham Palace, then of course we [wear suits]."

The Prince and Princess of Wales recently relocated from Kensington Palace in London to Adelaide Cottage in Berkshire, downsizing to the modest four-bedroom home nearby to Windsor Castle. 

The move was made in order for the family to live a more low-key lifestyle and to be nearer members of The Firm and the Middleton family. 

"Kate and William were very keen for a modest home to start their new lives in Windsor. Adelaide Cottage fits the bill because it is a four-bedroom home and they do not need any more as they have no live-in staff," an insider is said to have told The Sun. 

"They were adamant they didn’t want anything too showy or anything that needed renovating or extra security so as not to be a burden on the taxpayer."