Prince George could one day inherit a McDonalds and a Primark from the Queen

Prince George could become the proud owner of the popular burger joint if he ever becomes King...

prince george inherit mcdonalds
(Image credit: WireImage)

Prince George could one day be set to inherit a McDonald's restaurant from his great-grandmother the Queen.

  • Prince George could one day be set to inherit a McDonald's restaurant from his great-grandmother the Queen.
  • The young royal could one day be the proud owner of one of the fast food joint's branches, as well as a Primark store.
  • In other royal news, the royal parenting traditions that the Duchess of Cambridge refuses to follow with Prince George and Princess Charlotte.

Prince George is set to inherit quite a bit in the future. However, it might come as a surprise to many to learn that one of the things that makes this list is none other than a drive-thru McDonald's joint (opens in new tab).

As well as properties owned by his father Prince William and grandfather Prince Charles, there is also the potential for Prince George to inherit part of the Duchy estate - Prince Charles' private estate - which is currently used to fund the public, private and charitable activities of The Duke and his children.

Traditionally owned by the eldest surviving son of the Monarch and heir to the throne, if Prince William one day becomes King, the estate will be owned by Prince George.

MORE: Secrets behind Prince William's bond with son Prince George have been revealed in new film

However, it is his great-grandmothers estate – The Crown Estate – which could mean that Prince George will one day inherit a McDonalds (opens in new tab) – and a Primark (opens in new tab) to boot – among other businesses and retail establishments.

In 2008, it was revealed that the Queen was actually the proud owner of a  drive-through McDonald's, after The Crown Estate acquired a retail park in Slough where it is located.

The Crown Estate is a portfolio of lands and holdings in the UK that belong to the reigning British monarch, making it the "Sovereign's public estate".

prince george inherit mcdonalds

Prince George may to get to live every kid's dream and own his own fast food joint (Credit: Getty)

The Crown Estate purchased Bath Road Retail Park in 2008, meaning that the Queen acquired a collection of new shops and businesses as a result, including a B&Q superstore, Comet, and Mothercare.

The Crown Estate said after the purchase: 'We are a reliable purchaser in this difficult market.'

The Queen also owns The Banbury Gateway Shopping Park in Oxford via the Crown Estate, in which you will find a whole host of shops including a Primark. We doubt you’ll find any members of the royal family wearing their affordable basics though or nipping down to the Primark they own to browse cheap beauty tools (opens in new tab) or merchandise from their favourite series (opens in new tab). But you never know...

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Although the Queen doesn’t profit from any of the businesses on the land owned by The Crown Estate, she does see a report each year which shows the performance of the estate.

After the Queen dies, the land will belong to the next reigning monarch, which will probably be Prince Charles. The land will then pass on to Prince William one day and eventually, if he does ever become a monarch, Prince George. Meaning that little Prince George could one day become the proud owner of his very own McDonalds. That is surely every kids dream…right?

Aleesha Badkar
Aleesha Badkar

Aleesha Badkar is a lifestyle writer who specialises in health, beauty - and the royals. After completing her MA in Magazine Journalism at the City, the University of London in 2017, she interned at Women’s Health, Stylist, and Harper’s Bazaar, creating features and news pieces on health, beauty, and fitness, wellbeing, and food. She loves to practice what she preaches in her everyday life with copious amounts of herbal tea, Pilates, and hyaluronic acid.