Which ministers have resigned? A list of all the resignations under Boris Johnson

The full list of which ministers have resigned from Boris Johnson's government.

Ministers that have resigned include Chancellor Rishi Sunak and Health Minister Sajid Javid, pictured outside no. 10
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Two of the Government's most senior cabinet ministers - Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid - have resigned. Here's the full list of which ministers have resigned under Boris Johnson.

The Conservative party has been rocked by scandals in recent months. May saw the release of the Sue Gray report, the PM faced a vote of confidence in June, and most recently the party's deputy chief whip, Chris Pincher, has been accused of sexual assault.

Following growing pressure, Boris Johnson announced his resignation (opens in new tab), with many wondering what happens when a Prime Minister resigns (opens in new tab) and when will the next Prime Minister be announced (opens in new tab)

Which ministers have resigned?

Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak, and Health Minister Sajid Javid handed in their resignations within minutes of each other on July 5, 2022. As two of the Government's most senior ministers, the resignations are a blow to Boris Johnson's leadership, who only recently survived a confidence vote.

Among the high profile cabinet ministers, children and families minister Will Quince and Tory vice chair Bim Afolami have also resigned, alongside several other junior ministers.

a collage of Rishi Sunak, Sajid Javid and Will Quince

(Image credit: Future/Getty)

Read on for the full list of which ministers have resigned so far.

Rishi Sunak - Chancellor of the Exchequer

As Chancellor of the Exchequer, Rishi Sunak's resignation is the most significant. First elected to Parliament in 2015, Sunak was appointed as Chancellor by Boris Johnson in February 2020, after serving as Chief Secretary to the Treasury.

During his time, Rishi announced a £150 council tax rebate (opens in new tab) in response to the ongoing cost of living crisis.

In his resignation letter (opens in new tab), the Chancellor said that the public expect government to be conducted "properly, competently and seriously." He also said that he felt his own approach to the economy was "fundamentally too different" to that of Boris Johnson.

Rishi Sunak has since become the frontrunner in the race to replace Johnson - for which the TV debates (opens in new tab) are about to take place - leaving many wanting to know more about the ex-Chancellor, including how he voted on Brexit (opens in new tab) and what his net worth is (opens in new tab).

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Sajid Javid - Health Secretary

Sajid Javid first joined Parliament when he was elected as Conservative MP for Bromsgrove in 2010. Previously, Javid served as Chancellor of the Exchequer; Home Secretary; Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government; Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills; and Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, before being appointed as health minister in June 2021.

During his time as Health Secretary, Javid has navigated the Covid pandemic, introducing vaccines for 12-15 year olds (opens in new tab) and reducing the isolation period (opens in new tab).

In Sajid Javid's resignation letter (opens in new tab), he said "I can no longer, in good conscience, continue serving in this government," and that he has 'lost confidence' in the PM.

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Other resignations in July

  • Simon Hart - Welsh Secretary
  • Brandon Lewis - Northern Ireland Secretary
  • Michelle Donelan - Education Secretary
  • Will Quince - children and families minister
  • Alex Chalk - Solicitor General
  • Robin Walker - schools minister
  • John Glenn - Treasury minister
  • Victoria Atkins - minister of state at the Ministry of Justice
  • Jo Churchill - environment minister
  • Stuart Andrew - housing minister
  • Kemi Badenoch - equalities minister
  • Neil O'Brien - levelling up minister
  • Alex Burghart - skills minister
  • Lee Rowley - business minister
  • Julia Lopez - minister for media, data and digital infrastructure
  • Mims Davies - employment minister
  • Rachel Maclean - Home Office minister
  • Mike Freer - equalities minister
  • Edward Argar - health minister
  • Helen Whately - treasury minister
  • Damian Hinds - security minister
  • George Freeman - science minister
  • Guy Opperman - pensions minister
  • Chris Philp - technology minister
  • James Cartlidge - courts minister
  • Rebecca Pow - environment minister
  • Caroline Johnson - Conservative Party vice-chair
  • Luke Hall - deputy chair of the Conservative Party
  • Saqib Bhatti - parliamentary private secretary to the Health Secretary
  • Jonathan Gullis - parliamentary private secretary to the Northern Ireland secretary
  • Nicola Richards - parliamentary private secretary to the Department for Transport
  • Virginia Crosbie - parliamentary private secretary at the Welsh Office
  • Laura Trott - parliamentary private secretary in the Department of Transport
  • Felicity Buchan - parliamentary private secretary in the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
  • Selaine Saxby - parliamentary private secretary in the treasury
  • Claire Coutinho - parliamentary private secretary in the treasury
  • David Johnston - parliamentary private secretary to the Education Office
  • Duncan Baker - parliamentary private secretary in the Department for Levelling Up
  • Craig Williams - parliamentary private secretary to the Treasury
  • Mark Logan - parliamentary private secretary to the Northern Ireland Office
  • Sara Britcliffe - parliamentary private secretary in the Department for Education
  • Ruth Edwards -parliamentary private secretary to the Scottish Office
  • Peter Gibson - parliamentary private secretary in the Department for International Trade
  • James Sunderland - parliamentary private secretary in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
  • Jacob Young - parliamentary private secretary in the Department for Levelling Up
  • Mark Fletcher - parliamentary private secretary in the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
  • James Daly - parliamentary private secretary in the Department for Work and Pensions
  • Danny Kruger - parliamentary private secretary in the Department for Levelling Up
  • Gareth Davies parliamentary private secretary in the Department of Health and Social Care
  • Rob Butler parliamentary private secretary to the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office
  • Bim Afolami - Tory vice chair
  • Andrew Murrison - trade envoy to Morocco 
  • Theo Clarke - trade envoy to Kenya
  • David Duguid - trade envoy to Angola and Zambia
  • David Mundell - trade envoy for New Zealand
  • Richard Graham - trade envoy for Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines

Michael Gove, Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities was sacked by Boris Johnson on July 6, after he urged the PM to resign.

Michael Gove, who was sacked by Boris Johnson, pictured giving a speech

(Image credit: Getty Images)

Resignations under Boris Johnson to date

  • September 2019: Jo Johnson, the PM's brother, resigned as minister of state for universities, science, research and innovation in saying he was "torn between family loyalty and the national interest."
  • February 2020: Sajid Javid has resigned once before, as Chancellor, after he was told he would lose his team of special advisers at the Treasury.
  • May 2020: Conor Burns resigned as a trade minister after allegations of intimidation. In September 2021, he was appointed as Minister of State for Northern Ireland.
  • May 2020: Douglas Ross, parliamentary under secretary of state for Scotland, resigned in protest over Dominic Cummings‘ alleged breach of lockdown rules.
  • April 2021: Johnny Mercer resigned as a defence minister over the treatment of veterans who served in Northern Ireland.
  • June 2021: Matt Hancock resigned as Health Secretary after he was forced to admit to to breaching Covid restrictions when CCTV footage emerged of Hancock embracing one of his aides, Gina Coldangelo.
  • December 2021: Brexit minister Lord David Frost resigned over "concerns about the current direction of travel" within government.
  • January 2022: Lord Agnew resigned as a minister of state at the Cabinet Office and the Treasury over the Government's approach to tackling fraud in a multi-billion-pound Covid loan scheme.
  • June 2022: Oliver Dowden quit as Conservative chairmen, referencing the Partygate scandal in his resignation.

The last couple of days have seen an exodus of Conservative ministers, but Boris Johnson's leadership is no stranger to shock resignations.

Who is the new Chancellor of the Exchequer?

It has been announced that Nadhim Zahawi is the new Chancellor of the Exchequer following Rishi Sunak's resignation. Zahawi served as Education Secretary in the cabinet from September 2021, but now universities minister Michelle Donelan will be replacing him.

Nadhim Zahawi was first elected as Conservative MP for Stratford-on-Avon in May 2010, and has previously served in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Department of Health and Social Care, following his role as parliamentary under secretary of state at the Department for Education.

Who is the new Health Secretary?

Former chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and chief of staff for Downing Street, Steve Barclay, has been appointed as the new Health Minister. Barclay joined Parliament in 2010 as MP for North East Cambridgeshire, and has previously served as Chief Secretary to the Treasury; Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union; Minister of State for the Department of Health and Social Care; and Economic Secretary to the Treasury.

Taking to Twitter (opens in new tab), Barclay said he was "delighted" to be in the new role. He added: "Looking forward to working with fantastic @NHSEngland & social care staff. Together we will beat the Covid backlogs, boost patient access & ensure health services deliver for everyone."

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Ellie Hutchings
Ellie Hutchings

Ellie joined Goodto as a Junior Features Writer in 2022 after finishing her Master’s in Magazine Journalism at Nottingham Trent University. Previously, she completed successful work experience placements with BBC Good Food, The Big Issue and the Nottingham Post, and freelanced as an arts and entertainment writer alongside her studies. In 2021, Ellie graduated from Cardiff University with a first-class degree in Journalism.