Tuna spaghetti Bolognese recipe

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A brilliant twist on a classic Bolognese, this tuna spaghetti Bolognese is suitable for pescatarians or just for days when you don't want to eat meat. This serves four and makes a great family dinner.

tuna spaghetti Bolognese
  • Low-fat
Serves4
SkillEasy
Preparation Time5 mins
Cooking Time10 mins
Total Time15 mins

This tuna spaghetti Bolognese is a fishy twist on one of our favourite family dinners, great for days when you don't have much time for cooking.

This dinner can be on the table in 15 minutes flat, and almost entirely uses store cupboard ingredients. That means you don't need to think about shopping for it, and you hardly even have to think about making it. You can toss in all sorts of extras you find in the fridge - chopped spring onions, thinly slices celery or diced carrots. Swap the peas for sweetcorn if you prefer, or leave them out altogether.

Ingredients

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 250g chestnut mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 2 x 185g cans tuna in spring water, drained
  • 500g jar Dolmio extra onion and garlic sauce for bolognese
  • 100g frozen peas
  • Bunch of parsley, finely chopped
  • 400g tagliatelle or other pasta shapes

WEIGHT CONVERTER

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Method

  1. Cook the pasta according to the packet instructions. Add the frozen peas about 3 minutes before the end of cooking. 
  2. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan and cook the mushrooms for 3 - 4 mins until golden. Add the tuna and sauce and bring to a gentle simmer. 
  3. Stir the parsley and a good grinding of black pepper into the sauce. Drain the pasta and peas and add to the sauce. Toss well to coat then divide between bowls and serve.

Top tip for making tuna spaghetti Bolognese

Tuna in oil or tuna in brine? Chef and author Bart van Olphen, who turns tinned fish into a luxury ingredient in his book The Tinned Fish Cookbook, recommends cooking with fish in oil, and using brined fish in salads and sandwiches. The brine can dehyrated quickly when cooked, whereas the oil keeps the fish succulent. 

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Jessica Dady
Food Editor

Jessica Dady is Food Editor at GoodtoKnow and has over 11 years of experience as a digital editor, specialising in all things food, recipes, and SEO. From the must-buy seasonal food hampers and advent calendars for Christmas to the family-friendly air fryers that’ll make dinner time a breeze, Jessica loves trying and testing various food products to find the best of the best for the busy parents among us. Over the years of working with GoodtoKnow, Jessica has had the privilege of working alongside Future’s Test Kitchen to create exclusive videos - as well as writing, testing, and shooting her own recipes. When she’s not embracing the great outdoors with her family at the weekends, Jessica enjoys baking up a storm in the kitchen with her favourite bakes being chocolate chip cookies, cupcakes, and a tray of gooey chocolate brownies