King Charles III has revealed the Queen's 'greatest comfort' in emotional thanksgiving message

King Charles III gave an emotional reply to the motion of condolence at Scottish Parliament.

King Charles III reveals Queen's 'greatest comfort'
(Image credit: Getty)

King Charles III gets emotional as he reveals the Queen's 'greatest comfort' as monarch in his reply to the motion of Condolence at Scottish Parliament.


The King, who has been succeeded to the throne following the death of his mother The Queen, gave a statement on Monday which expressed the 'greatest comfort' his late mother had knowing the affection Scottish people had for her.

After a special service at St Giles Cathedral, Edinburgh, King Charles read a statement and it said, "I know that the Scottish Parliament and the people of Scotland share with me a profound sense of grief at the death of my beloved mother.  Through all the years of her reign, The Queen, like so many generations of our family before her, found in the hills of this land, and in the hearts of its people, a haven and a home."

In taking a look back on her life, he continued, "My mother felt, as I do, the greatest admiration for the Scottish people, for their magnificent achievements and their indomitable spirit.  And it was the greatest comfort for her to know, in turn, the true affection in which she was held.  The knowledge of that deep and abiding bond must be to us a solace as we mourn the end of a life of incomparable service." 

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King Charles went on to make reference to Scottish poet Robert Burns in describing the Queen, he said she was, "The friend of man, the friend of truth;/The friend of age, and guide of youth:/Few hearts like hers, with virtue warm’d, /Few heads with knowledge so inform’d." 

Prince Charles also acknowledged that his son Prince William would become Prince of Wales and would also take the title Duke of Rothesay and added, "I know [he] will be as proud as I have been to bear the symbols of this ancient Kingdom." 

The Queen's coffin, which is draped in the Royal Standard in Scotland, had been moved from Holyroodhouse to St. Giles' cathedral. Dressed with a wreath of flowers including white roses, freesias, button chrysanthemums, dried white heather from Balmoral (opens in new tab) and finished with eryngium, foliage, rosemary, hebe, and pittosporum.