King Charles III’s coronation date was not meant to snub Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, claims royal author

“Archie’s birthday was the last thing they thought about”

King Charles, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle
(Image credit: Chris Jackson/Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation and Kirsty O'Connor - Pool/Getty Images/Future)

When the date of King Charles III's coronation (opens in new tab) was announced, many eagled-eyed royal fans noticed that it coincides with Prince Harry (opens in new tab) and Meghan Markle (opens in new tab)'s son's, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor’s, fourth birthday

When it was announced that King Charles III’s scaled-back coronation would take place on the 6th of May 2023, many royal followers was quick to point out that the event would take place on Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's son's, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor’s, fourth birthday.

Considering the well reported ongoing tensions between Charles and his youngest son, questions were quickly raised as to what the choice of date might mean - the biggest one being, 'is this a slight at Prince Harry and his family?'

King Charles

(Image credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Tom Bower, author of Revenge: Meghan, Harry, and the War Between the Windsors which is available now on Amazon (opens in new tab), was quick to speak out against the rumours, pointing out that this was absolutely nothing to do with Archie's birthday. Bower said that it is “nonsense” to believe that the date was intentionally chosen as a dig at Harry, his wife Meghan Markle, and their children two Archie, three, and Lilibet, one.

Speaking to Page Six, Bower explained, “Archie’s birthday was the last thing they thought about. The date was chosen because it’s just before the State Opening of Parliament and Charles will want to appear as king with his crown and the whole ceremonial [robes].

The State Opening of Parliament is a ceremonial event that marks the beginning of a session of Parliament. The event includes a speech from the reigning monarch, known as the King’s (or, prior to her death, the Queen’s) speech. The late Queen Elizabeth opened nearly every session of parliament during her historic 70-year reign, apart from three, in 1959 and 1963 when she was pregnant, and 2022, when she was too frail to attend.

“They looked at what was happening in Britain,” Bower added. “They didn’t look at what was happening in Montecito [California, where the Sussexes reside]. The idea that anyone was concerned with that is nonsense.”

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