King Charles will read Prince Harry's memoir before deciding on Lillibet and Archie's new titles, a new book claims

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's children have inherited the right to be a HRH, but they may not be granted the titles

King Charles will read Prince Harry's memoir before deciding on Lillibet and Archie's new titles, a new book claims
(Image credit: Chris Jackson/Getty Images/Future)

King Charles III is reportedly waiting for the release of Prince Harry's (opens in new tab) tell-all memoir (opens in new tab) before deciding whether his children, Archie (opens in new tab) and Lilibet (opens in new tab) will receive their rightly inherited titles (opens in new tab).

  • Upon the death of the Queen (opens in new tab) on the 8th of September 2022, The Sussex children inherited the right to be a HRH, but whether they receive the title is yet to be seen
  • According to a new book, King Charles III is reportedly waiting to read Prince Harry's upcoming memoir before granting any titles to his grandchildren (opens in new tab)
  • The royal news (opens in new tab) follows reports that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle (opens in new tab) have returned to US to reunite with Archie and Lilibet (opens in new tab) after the Queen's funeral

King Charles III is reportedly waiting for his son Prince Harry’s memoir to be released before he decides whether his and Meghan Markle's children will inherit new titles, a new book has claimed.

After the death of the Queen, when Charles became King Charles III, his grandchildren, Archie and Lilibet, fell into the 1917 Letters Patent. The 1917 Letters Patent is a ruling that means all grandchildren of the monarch can inherit His/Her Royal Highness, more commonly styles as HRH, titles.

Despite this historically upheld ruling, a new book by Vanity Fair’s royal correspondent, Katie Nicholl (opens in new tab), The New Royals, which is available for preorder on Amazon (opens in new tab) ahead of it's release on the 4th of October 2022, has claimed that King Charles is waiting for the release of Harry’s memoir before deciding if his son's two young children will receive their royal titles.

In an excerpt published by Vanity Fair (opens in new tab), Nicholl explained that, when Charles became King following the death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth, Harry and Meghan Markle’s two children inherited the right to be a HRH, with three-year-old Archie to be a prince and one-year-old Lilibet to be a princess.